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. i plan to vote for this bill, h.r. 6156, even though i remain strongly opposed to granting russia permanent normal trade relations or pntr, at this time. i would like to explain the reasons why. those who argued for granting russia pntr, which has until now been prevented by what is known as the jackson-vanik amendment, focus on the supposedly bilateral trade benefits. the issue that concerns me and many members is not trade but human rights. advocates of repeal say that the jackson-vanik amendment is outdated and is purely symbolic and therefore should be disregarded. but in the ira of human rights, madam speaker, symbols can have a very great importance. over the years jackson-vanik has become a sign of the continuing u.s. commitment to human rights in russia and elsewhere. repealing the amendment could very well be interpreted as an indication that our commitment is now weakening. this would be a terrible signal to send at a time when putin is in the process of imposing ever tighter restrictions on all opposition to his regime, especially democratic activists and any others who
by china, russia and iran that would give the united nations control over the internet. we'll see what this week's u.n. vote could mean for your usage of the net here in america. >>> and a victim of superstorm sandy who got a personal promise from the president, now speaking out and calling the president's trip to new jersey, a big waste of time. >>> as we await the white house press briefing the senate bracing itself for possible confirmation hearings on u.s. ambassador susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. the buzz on this is growing but could the benghazi debacle sink her chances and should it? we'll have a fair and balanced debate on that next. >> i think if he does, it could be, that kind of arrogance which is what i think it would be could be his undoing, because if she is put under oath and forced to go through and answer all these questions about benghazi i think it will put the administration in a really bad position ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting u
the economy. also now we're hearing reaction from world leaders. russia saying it is willing to cooperate with the u.s. as far as washington is willing to go. israel offered muted congratulations. they had strongly supported romney. we're even hearing from the taliban in pakistan saying, you know what, obama and romney are pretty much the same enemy that we'll continue to fight. for obama, only hours after winning his next term, he's getting his first order of overseas business, at least courtesy of british prime minister david cameron who in a tweet today called obama his friend. he was interviewed on the border with jordan and syria and said that they must do something now. he wants balk's help to assist the people of syria to save them from the slaughter he said is going on there, to put more pressure on the assad regime and to help the rebels. lynn? >> now the work begins. michelle, thanks so much. affirmative action. smoking marijuana for pleasure and defining marriage. how did the states vote? >>> plus president obama's vision for america over the next four years and beyond in his o
for him to step down and leave his country. in an interview that aired node russia the president, bashar al-assad, declared "i will live and die in syria." he is living now and we hope for the latter soon, he has murdered 32,000 people. a day after the british prime minister suggested a deal that would allow the leader to go safely into, i'll as a end this civil war that began 19 months ago. jonathan hunt joins us now. one could argue that a safe way out is no justice for him but maybe it would stop more murders. >>jonathan: he certainly seems to have made the decision as many experts have said, this is a fight to the end. the end for him is going to mean probably as its did for muammar qaddafi in libya, death. in this interview aired today to part on a tv stay of english language in russia he said and i quote, "i am not a put -- puppet ," and here makes cheer he will not resign or leave. and talking about whether any western powers might ultimately put boots on the ground if syria, he says and i quote, "i don't think the west is headed in this direction but if it does, nobody can predic
coming in from russia, switzerland and france under the mantle of the palestinian authorities are going to open the grave this coming week. they're going to take samples and shut the grave again on the same day. it's a very emotional day for palestinians because he is this overarching palestinian figure, but also a very, very interesting and almost exciting forensic case as well, victor. >> we know that the investigative committee held a news conference a short time ago. what more are we learning about how they're moving forward? >> reporter: well, they said they're moving forward in a way that, first of all, they pushed back the date for when the grave was going to be opened. they then went through the motions how all of this is going down. they said there's going to be a very ceremonial opening of the grave, then they're going to take the samples and then arafat is going to be laid to rest again with a religious ceremony and a military ceremony as well. that's sort of the process that's going to go on. what's going to happen is these three forensic teams, the russian, french and swiss
increasing pressure for him to step down and leave his country. in an interview that aired node russia the president, bashar al-assad, declared "i will live and die in syria." he is living now and we hope for the latter soon, he has murdered 32,000 people. a day after the british prime minister suggested a deal that would allow the leader to go safely into, i'll as a way to end this civil war that began 19 months ago. jonathan hunt joins us now. one could argue that a safe way out is no justice for him but maybe it would stop more murders. >>jonathan: he certainly seems to have made the decision as many experts have said, this is a fight to the end. the end for him is going to mean probably as its did for muammar qaddafi in libya, death. in this interview aired today to part on a tv stay of english language in russia he said and i quote, "i am not a put -- puppet ," and here makes cheer he will not resign or leave. and talking about whether any western powers might ultimately put boots on the ground if syria, he says and i quote, "i don't think the west is headed in this direction but
note just in passing that my wife's father, my father-in-law was born in russia, emigrated to the united states, like the rabbi and senator kohl's father. mr. president, it took four months but the republicans will finally realizing their way back from the fiscal cliff has been right in front of them all along. in july the senate passed legislation to give economic certainty to 98% of american families and to small businesses, to every american making less than $250,000 a year. for four months we've been one vote away for from a solution to this looming crisis. they've held the middle-class hostage to protect the richest 2% of taxpayers, people who enjoyed a decade of ballooning income and shrinking tax bills. one has to admire the president, who went out and campaigned on this issue. he didn't -- he didn't in any way walk away from the issue. he said that's how we're going to get our fiscal house in order. and independents by a huge margin, democrats by a huge margin, and 41e% of republicans support what the president asked us to do. now, reasonable republicans are coming
. the question was about to russia's role in asia pacific. russia was this year's host of apac. it will participate at the east asia summit. it is an important player in the asia-pacific region. both economically and diplomatically. it will continue to be so. >> regarding the president's trip to burma. human-rights leaders expressed concerns that this visit was too fast, too generous. their main concern here is that the administration is far leveraging the opportunity of the first presidential visit which can only be once to press for new reforms. has the administration been able to leverage this a budget -- visit for tangible foreign measures? would you like to be secretary of state? thank you. [laughter] >> thank you for those questions, josh. with respect to burma -- there have been remarkable progress. since we saw the president called them cookers of progress in the summer of 2011. you have seen the release of prisoners, you have seen the easing of the media restrictions, you have seen the infighting into the political process of the parties. we have consulted with stakeho
in all of these great events and really influencing american policy toward russia and having to worry about that, and yet at the same time he was concerned about my welfare and whether or not i was learning anything. c-span: there was a moment in the book you describe where you went to his house, and you were supposed to go to see him -- i think he was up on the third floor, and you caught him watching "the dick van dyke show." what was so unusual about that? >> guest: that was such a fantastic memory for me because nixon always claimed that he never watched television, and of course he did. he liked to watch the news. he watched sporting events. he used to watch football and baseball quite avidly. but he never admitted to watching sort of mindless entertainment. so i was usually about five minutes late for our meetings at the residence in the afternoon, so he normally expected me to be late. and this one day in particular i was five minutes early, and i was walking up the stairs, and before i could clear the stairs to the third floor, i heard the television going. and then i heard ca
where it was just the united states and russia, and now i think we have to drain the swamp. there is no other way, a sane way ahead >> you worry about rogue states, of course. you worry about terrorists. you worry about accidents. have you a movie "countdown to zero" which makes this argument in a really compelling way, and it telling the story of one russian man who actually tried to sell nuclear material to al qaeda. >> yes. >> the vignette of that was rather a low level worker in a uranium plant in the former soviet union, and he knew that by taking -- he could secrete very small amounts of highly enriched uranium, and he had a buyer that was a representative al qaeda, and the whole reason that he wanted to sell that was so that he could get a refrigerator. i mean, for him that was what -- that's all it was to him, a means to, you know, make his personal life a little better. >> queen noor, when you look at this and say you want the u.s. to lead the way and russia to lead the way in reducing nuclear arsenals. the counterargument is wait a minute all the bad actors in the
combined. china, russia, france, the united kingdom, you name it, next ten. >> reporter: sequestration would not change that according to the center for strategic and budgetary assessment, it is not the size of the cuts, about $50 billion a year that would be so damaging but the fact that they would be across-the-board. panetta adds that except for military pay every program from the joint strike fighter military band was be cut by the same amount, 23%. >> it's absolutely a foolish thing to do. if you want to cut the defense budget that's fine. this is a foolish way to do it. >> reporter: in other words, if the pentagon were allowed to pick and choose its cuts sequestration might not be the disaster secretary panetta is predicting. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. >> glor: pentagon contractors aren't the only one in with a stake in this debate. 120,000 small contractors take part in the federal marketplace. a market worth $500 billion. lowell vant slot is scrambling to run every conceivable raanning scenario for 2013. he's the military contracts manager for u.s. technologies which
area of the world in which most of threats and challenges. it's not a rising china. it's not a russia seeking to regain its power and stature. real threat to american interests seems to be coming from a broken and dysfunctional middle east in which we're stuck and his problem. and had mitt romney become president as well, middle east is divided into migraines on one hand and root canal operations on the other. there are not a lot of opportunities for solutions. >> gregg: pick your poison. you are right. let's talk specifics. let's talk about iran first. you believe that the president should explore and exhaust diplomacy before you are taking military action. you are very specific. let's put this on the screen. you write this, start with an interim arrange. that deals with the issue of enrichment and forestalls resign to acquire highly enriched uranium to construct a nuke. how can you convinces them to do that? >> the problem is once a society gets to enrich uranium and a assemble a nuclear weapon. how do you forestall it? you can't bomb it out of existence. unless you can change the r
from the beginning. i thought he may have voted the same way barack did. he went from labeling russia, which he recently called the soviet union, labeling russia are most significant geopolitical foe -- let me tell you something, he also was opposed to the new start treaty which every single solitary former republican secretary of state, republican national security adviser, republican secretary of defense was for. he was against it. he said he would have never supported it. all of a sudden -- i tell you. it is amazing. we can work with russia, we can be very close with russia. [laughter] he went from harshly criticizing us to saying we will and we will turn over for responsibility to the afghan military at the end of 2014. [applause] he went from saying we should never have set a timetable, he would not do that. i had a debate, too, with ryan. [applause] in my day, he was talking about more troops in the east, more americans would be there -- we should not have set a date. then along comes romney -- my generation has gone on the wings of a snow white dove, preaching -- preaching love
visit to russia. the skipper of the uss vand vandergrift. they have been cracking down on this behavior in recent years. >>> and more than 1,000 people, many of them with puppets turned out for the million puppet march in washington, d.c. they were showing their support for government funding of pbs. it was inspired or in reaction to the comments by mitt romney, about cutting the deficit, including less money for public television. >>> finally, no excuses to be lazy this sunday morning. this man is climbing the stairs of the wilson tower with a groundbreaking bionic leg. the leg is controlled by his thoughts. it's pretty wild. he's climbing the 103 floors as part of the annual skyrise event. how about that? pretty amazing. >> incredible. >> i try to get my body to do all sort of things. >>> it's fall back. so, if you're at all confused by your clocks, it's fall back. it's the best day of the year who work in morning television. ginger, over to you. >> except the meteorologist who gets in before midnight. either way, you need to get some sleep later, and it's going to be easy to sleep in
in russia, same kind of thing. we offered plenty of earthquake aid. after 2002, after 9/11 and iran had a horrible earthquake and accepted american assistance and tensions worsened quite a bit since then. melissa: do you think they offered to put people on a plane because they knew the airports were closed? >> i think they knew we would not say yes. had they said yes they could have grabbed the intelligence community and stuff the intelligence officers in the crowd coming over here any way so we would say no to it. melissa: would there be upside to us. great, come on over. bring money. come help us out, bring whatever you have. is there any upside to the u.s.? do we look good? do we get anything out of isn't. >> iran is playing a global game on acquisition of nuclear weapons and u.s. and europe are trying to very hard to keep severe sanctions in place and put a hurt on the iranian economy. for us it would be a pr loss. for them it will was pr win. they get most of the win say hey we were willing to do this. they just decided not to accept it. melissa: yeah. i mean, speaking of pr, i mea
for this earnings season. liz: you have to watch out for the middle east, europe and russia segment. it was last quarter that they did miss and lowered their full year 2013 eps schedules and that certainly spooked at least some of the analysts. that is something i think the people will really be wondering about. i am just kind of searching here. you are looking for that particular region. operating losses i am seeing of 6.5 million. >> that is a very good point. it is hard to argue that, as well. again, i think the market maybe looking like like it is priced in and discounted. if you are able, that is what you are saying. that is a very good point you raise. david: specifics as they begin to settle. we are just getting back on our feet as far as trading is concerned. >> these are the numbers. the official release has not hit yet. forty-six cents per share coming in for the fiscal fourth quarter. that beats the average estimate. one of the reasons you are seeing the stock jumped is they are boosting their forecast for next year. only by a penny on the upper range. giving them a little more breath
. they relieved them of their duties because of a drunken port visit to russia. commander joseph darlak, skipper of the "uss van schlt s" was relieved after demonstrating poor leadership. the navy has been cracking down on this kind of behavior in recent years. >>> more than a thousand people, many of them with puppets, turned out for the million puppet march in washington, d.c. they were showing their support for government funding of pbs. it was inspired or you could say in reaction by comments made by mitt romney when he talked about cutting the deficit including less money for public television. >>> and finally, no excuses to be lazy this sunday morning, 31-year-old zach vaulter is climbing the stairs of the willis tower today in chicago, illinois, with a groundbreaking or with a groundbreaking bionic leg. the leg is controlled by his thoughts responding when he thinks climb stairs. it's pretty wild. he's climbing the 103 floors as part of the annual sky-rise event. how about that? >> that is incredible. >> pretty amazing. incredible, dan. >> i try to get my body to do all sorts of things. w
, and he certainly came out fighting in this interview with russia today. english language russian tv station. not only that absolute refusal to resign and seek exile that you just heard. but also a stark warning to the the west, not to try to intervene militarily in syria. listen. >> i think the price of this invasion, if it happens, is going to be -- whole world are can't afford if you have a problem in syria -- in the region and coexistent let's say. it will have domino effect. effect the world from the atlantic to the pacific. and, you know, the implication [inaudible] >> of course, u.s. officials have no appetite whatsoever for any kind of military action in syria on that at least president assad is correct. russians are frankly still the problem here. >> absolutely. more support for assad from russian officials. in this case today, the foreign minister sergei said that the west simply has to accept that assad is not going to step aside. and if western powers keep insisting that the price is, as he put it, assad's head, it will simply cost more syrian lives. now, russian official
and in russia, and a whole new set of political and social institutions. and my concluding argument is, we really need to be thinking about a social and political adjustment comparable to the one that we -- >> so who puts that in place? the government you say that's bought by the rich? the problem is that how do you solve that? the rich always get control of the government. right? that's why government needs to be as small as possible. the bigger it gets, the more it gets bought. that's the problem. >> actually, i strongly disagree with that. that's a real -- >> that's the premise of your book. >> no, no. that's a counsel of despair to say the government is always going to be controlled and captured by the rich. i think the government can actually be controlled by democratic majorities. think that council of despair is one reason why american society overall is not stepping up to the challenge of our economic times. >> let me bring in robert frank, our wealth editor, for a question. thought? comment? >> thanks. congratulations on the book. >> thank you. >> just a quick question. the discus
. >> right. >> we should worry as a country when we are a punch line for russia. when russia looks at our democracy and says, wow, that's inefficient, wow, that has a lot of flaws. we're supposed to be the best. we were the best in 1776. we've got to update. >> part of that updating means now we all -- all have computerized databases statewide. >> right. that was part of the help america vote mandate act. >> that is right y. is it if you move from one county to another, if you don't reregister you're not in the system. >> it drives me nuts. it's like everybody in my world, like my friends, the post office, bill collectors. >> they can find you. >> magazine subscribers, they all know where i am. how does the voting system not. >> be very clear. we as an association have a 50 state database of every voter. >> you can purchase access to that. >> the same database that the folks who send you those catalogs use. >> exactly. >> so the federal government can use it and fix it like that. >> that's right. but the federal government won't. >> explain to us. >> because our infrastructure is based on
arabia and russia to become the world's largest oil producer by the year 2017 thanks to the shale oil revolution and the u.s. could become energy independent. but some analysts warn the u.s. oil boom is still in its infancy and continued growth at levels predicted might not be able to be guaranteed. phil flynn, seen i don't remember market analyst at price futures group. could this be energy independence in your foot, phil? >> yes it can. yes it can. all those people said we couldn't grow our way to energy independence, they're wrong. the people in the industry are very excited about that. you know why this is good, not only for the obvious geopolitical national security things but also because our economy needs something right now. it need as boost. it needs a driving force. energy and energy production probably will be that boost. it will be the new internet revolution, the new thing that could drive the economy for the next 10 to 20 years if not longer. rick: phil, i thought this administration was anti-drilling stood in the way of these kinds of advances. shot down the keystone oi
, where they were born and raised in russia and they inherited a lot of money and they are actually communists. so all the republican party kind of liens on their side. money is not given away -- some people just give money away or they loan it to you, but if you are going to give money for a republican to win, to buy a governor or a president, there is something you want back. all of these republicans better take in mind that they could be voting for a communist which is a movement coming into our country. the documentary says -- host: where did you see the documentary? caller: national geographic. from noon until 6:00, and half of it was about the koch brothers. but you saw it on the national geographic jenna? larry sabato, any response? guest: i am just on to say this. i never met the koch brothers and i never -- never corresponded with them. i've got news for you. they are not communists. i am pretty sure of that. so, let me just correct the record, and i think we should go on. host: how often do voters split tickets in virginia? guest: a very good question. virginia was once th
blamed missteps in countries such as brazil and russia for the miss. it assured the issues should be resolved by the end of the year. u.s. grocery chain whole foods has posted third quarter profits in line with forecasts. total sales jumped 24% in the period as consumers continue to switch towards organic produce. however the company did warn investors sales have been hit by the impact of hurricane sandy which left many of their customers without power. and that sent shares lower in after hours trade as you can see there, shedding about nearly 3%. we'll keep an eye on that. and just when new york city thought it was all over, a nor'easter called athena has smacked the tri-state area overnight dumping inches of snow over some of hurricane sandy's hardest hit areas. wind and heavy snow have brought down you power lines and electrical wires and thousands who lost power because of sandy just lost it all over again. now, caroline roth joins us from zurich because over in zurich, swiss re has reported results that have cheered the market. 1.6% at the moment. >> absolutely. earlier on in
that tokyo, st. petersburg, russia london the netherlands, all of them have some sort of storm surge barrier. but they are pricey. we're talking about however, $50 billion storm called sandy. >> where could they be built? >> realize that new york city is a victim of geography. it's like a funnel. if you have a gigantic storm coming in from the atlantic the power is concentrated as it goes past sandy point where it can savage staten island, inundate wall street and a second surge can come from the east river. so we need a barrier that gives us a comprehensive protection against this kind of storm surge. >> how much would it cost? >> well, we're talking about the fact that each of these barriers could cost about $1 billion. the whole thing would cost on the order of $10 billion, perhaps even $15 billion. >> show us how it works. >> here's how it works. there are three choke points whereby can you actually stop a storage surge. first, it's around arthur kill here around staten island. the other is around the verazano bridge. third, around the east river. each of these would
to russia and they're looking at markets like india. but they've not given up on europe, which will remain its key engine for growth. the european story is more nuanced than the eurozone crisis growth headlines would suggest. in fact, solaris has picked up new business in finland and belgium and will do record sales in spain this year. solaris management considers the company as much european as it is polish and believes the block is strongest staying together. so if the eurozone were a bus, say, none of the passengers should be forced to leave before the ultimate destination is reached. just setting aside for a moment the issue of trade into germany, the polish economy is clipping along at about 2.4% this year. it's expected to slow into next year. so what exactly is the central bank going to do to offset some of that weakness in domestic demand. i'm very pleased to have with me yang, on the committee, and also an academic economist. thank you for joining us. the central bank has been criticized by some for not cutting sooner and more aggressively. and the key policy rate still sits at 4.
. realize that tokyo, st. petersburg russia have storm surge barriers but they are pricey. >> where could they be built? >> realize that new york city is like a funnel. if you have a gigantic storm coming in from the atlantic it's power is concentrated as it goes past sandy point where it can savage staten island, inundate wall street and a second surge can come in from the east river. so we need a barrier that gives us a comprehensive protection against this kind of storm surge. >> how much it would cost? >> well we're talking about the fact that each of these barriers could cost a billion. the whole thing would cost 10 billion even $15 billion. >> show us how it wosrks. >> there's three choke points where you could stop a storm surge. here around arctic hill. next near the verrazano-narrows bridge and the next one is here. if you want the cadillac you want to put one between sandy hook and the rockaways. that would cost on the order of $6 billion. >> sthalt money well spent >> think of it as an insurance policy because the whole package could go over $10 billion. but hey that's church c
to see the u.n. become a global government, and the u.n. and china and russia which are not yet democratic country. they have veto power on the security council and the general assembly is controlled by nations, despotism, and either we defend it as reagan said or it goes away. and freedom is not the birth right of every human being without everybody fighting for it. >> well put. >> that's an exceptional interview. thank you for hauling yourself out of bed early on that sunday morning. what do you think about that, e-mail us. and the industry is thriving and all because of what they're doing below the surface of the earth. what is the future of american fuel, green or gas? then mitt romney shares a personal story that brings a crowd of 17,000 to its feet, gave goose bumps. how an american flag and a scout leader are making headlines. who is that guy who just absoluted? what's that flag? we're going to tell you. ♪ [ lisa ] my name's lisa, and chantix helped me quit. i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, c
the bomb on russia, which is a huge problem. so peter sellers in this movie playing numerous roles as he always does, he has to kind of coral all of these people in the government and try to stop this, the crazy war that's going to happen just randomly on one day. and this movie just keeps getting better with age because, you know, lines never stop being funny, as our world gets more and more ridiculous in real life. like george c. scott and the russian ambassador are fighting and peter sellers has to break it up by saying, you can't fight in here. this is the war room. >> i love it. >> and it's a classic. 1964. you are reaching back. not to confuse it with "dr. no." you start thinking about james bond movies, especially since we have been engamed in so much bond stuff with the release of the double-box set, but "dr. strangelove" a classic, a stand out in and of itself and your number one. >> yes, and thanks to my dad who showed this to me as a young age and taught me not to fight in the war room and show people the big boards. important lessons. >> thanks so much. always good to see you
to know if obama is president again we're going to end up like russia. there are thousands of family in cincinnati that have led from socialism. if we have obama as president socialism will be in the united states. host: less of a map to get a sense of where the candidates have been. -- let's look at a map to get a sense of where the candidates have been. all the candidates have been crisscrossing ohio. the other battleground states colorado, iowa, and now wisconsin. minnesota is in play. a romney in pennsylvania. the states of getting the most attention since the party conventions. they have been traveling to a total of 10 states. later this afternoon we will have live coverage of bombing donald. he will be joined by two of the romney sons. they are in virginia. good afternoon. caller: hello. i voted for obama because i am highly impressed with his leadership and the leadership he has shown throughout his administration. i am also impressed with his vice-president mr. joe biden. they work together as a team. we need to finish what we started. i also enjoyed listening to mr. biden's
that russia was our number one geopolitical enemy? it's all water under the bridge now. i do wonder, though, did any defining moment really change your mind or was your mind made up on day one? talk back today. election 2012, what was your defining moment? facebook.com/carolcnn. your responses later this hour. >>> a presidential election too close to call, a battleground state mired in voting problems and controversy. sound familiar? sure does in florida. those haunting memories of of that 2000 debacle are still painfully fresh and now a new crop of concerns are hanging over the elections there. ali velshi is keeping a close eye on the problems. he joins us from cnn's vote watch desk. it was ugly this weekend in florida. >> can you imagine that we're having this conversation about voting problems in florida? i guess it wouldn't be a batt battle -- without a battle in florida. one of third of the state's registered democrats do their voting in three counties. this is what the early voting lines looked like in miami yesterday. >> i've been waiting here since 12:30 to pick up an absentee ballo
poor. we have seen this in russia, china, east germany -- i mean, nobody is healthy. everybody is equally miserable everybody has to understand, let's not tax the wealthy so much, and pretty soon you will not have wealthy people any more, and everybody is not going to advance and our society will be poorer for it. host: that is joe in gaithersburg, maryland, in the suburbs of washington, d.c.. one of the races watch was in massachusetts. elizabeth warren gave her speech last night. [video clip] [applause] >> you did everything that everyone thought was impossible, he taught a scrappy, first-time candidate how to get in the ring and win. [applause] you took on the powerful wall street banks and special interests, and you let them tell you what a senator that will be out there fighting for the middle class all of the time. [applause] and despite the odds, you elected the first woman senator. [applause] i want to close by noting that it was exactly 50 years ago tonight that senator. kennedy was first elected to the united states -- ted kennedy was first elected to the united state
to compromise. >> steve: the president of the united states did tell the leader of russia that after the election, he would be more flexible. let's hope he's -- that would apply to the republican party. maybe they can actually get a deal because clearly, social security, medicare, the entitlements, all sorts of stuff has got to be fixed for it to go on. now is the time before it's too late. >> brian: let's hope the russian don't want to sell us bayonets because the president has no interest in that. >> gretchen: let's talk about colin powell. some people, were you surprised that he endorsed president obama again for this election cycle even though he is a republican? now he has some advice actually for the president of the united states. he has found at least two things that he needs to work on. >> it was going to be stiff resistance from the republicans. he did. but at the same time, i think he could have done more with respect to setting the right tone and showing some leadership and these are two areas that i think he really has to focus on in his second term. that is reaching out
sensors. russia shaeast navy commander said on june 1st, russian nuclear powered subs would return to the patrolling the world's oceans as they did iner earlier times. he downplayed the it off the east coast saying it was not seen as provocative, jenna. jenna: they were taking a tour, getting close to the coast? what were they doing? >> seems like they're probing and testing response times and testing to see if that sonar really detects them. in this case it did. jenna: in this case it did. a story we'll keep an eye on. that's for sure. jennifer, thank you. jon: good thing. president obama and house speaker john boehner, they are both calling for bipartisanship. they say they want to end the gridlock in washington. any real chance of that? a fair and balanced debate coming up. >>> we have newly-released video of a stolen plane on a wild and destructive ride. who was piloting and how this thing ended, coming up. are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-t
to russia today, television, and he said he's not going anywhere. i'm not a puppet. i was not made by the west, he said, to go to the west or to any other country. i'm a syrian. i was made in syria. i have to live in syria. and die in syria. that might sound a little bit familiar because if you replaced syria with word libya, it sounds like moammar gadhafi. >> turkish officials saying they're talking with nato of a possible deployment of missiles. >> their concern is cross-border violence going on over several months and killed turkish citizens on the turkish side of the border and lead to a spillover. they're concerned about that. the turkish president has said that this is something that's discussed. and this is an effort to contain the violence and not allow it to spill over. this is giving you a sense of the regional quality, the regional sort of how regionally this could spill over to syria. we have seen it in leb anna nicole and turkey and jordan. >> maybe a possible no-fly zone? >> i think we are far from that. very far from that idea. right now. there's no appetite because
about history know about wate waterloo. he was overextended in russia. i think if obama takes this as a mandate to complete the restructuring of america he is sadly mistaken. one other quick point, though, i just passed on the way over here another revival of the musical "andee." that premiered in 1979 as the carter administration was going down the tubes and ronald reagan came into office. i'm holding onto the song, the sun will come out tomorrow, bet your bottom dollar they'll be sun. jon: we all want this president to succeed but there are thorny issues out there, what are the media going to say in. >> we've already seen, jon, a super concentration on that fist alcliff. i don't think i can read one more story about it in any newspaper. i think the media are going to see whether or not barack obama meant what he said in his victory speech immediately after he was declared reelected, and that is, will he be reaching out to the republicans as he said he would? does he represent all americans and not just those who voted for him. can we really, finally come to grips with some o
and russia, they have palest havinians udied at the universities there. they have taken the technology home. this is widespread grad rocket -- katyusha rocket technology. >> if this becomes a ground war, i asked ben the same question this changes how? >> it changes in terms of civilian casualties, it is unavoidable if you put that much firepower in there. remember there is still the question here, post arab spring, everybody is looking to see mohamed morsi, turkey, these are muslim brotherhood, if you will, governments. they're looking for them, don, to in one way or another bring hamas under control, to calm us down. nobody wants a full blown conflict. fattah doesn't want it in the west bank. israelis don't want to see it. they're feeling more insecure than they have in years. they understand the current strategy won't hold in the future. >> this man knows his stuff. appreciate it, sir. >>> developing now here in the u.s., two people are missing after an oil platform explodes in the gulf of mexico. the platform about 20 miles off the coast of grand isle, louisiana. it is not a drilling fac
, are at stake here. and that's why this is so difficult for us. >> and -- >> -- like russia. and interesting timing for all of this, right, between this and ehud barak's, interesting to watch. jamie rubin always nice to have you with us. coming up at the top of the hour we're going to talk more about what's happening in the middle east with dr. hanan ashrawi of the palestinian liberation organization. >>> still ahead on "starting point," you know all that confetti that was raining down on thanksgiving day parades. wasn't that fabulous? well, actually, it was very sensitive information. oops. social security numbers, things like that. >>> also, the man who played one of the most beloved characters in movie history, peter billingsley, ravel if i, ta ral, talks about the new musical. we're back in just a moment. ti . because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your pur
finds itself swimming in controversy over a proposed plan to import 18 more of them from russia. >> we feel like our role is not only to have animals so that people can get inspired but to learn from them. >> reporter: the whales all captured in the last seven years would be spread out over six aquariums in the u.s. the first such import in almost two decades. >> we want to ensure that population is robust and can be maintained. and these belugas can be around for future generations to enjoy. >> this is about money. this is about ticket sales. >> reporter: a neuroscientist at emery university is among the thousands of people who have criticized the plan during an online comment period. she also points out that a newborn beluga whale died at the georgia aquarium earlier this year. >> their lives have ruined in captivity. they will be in a socially deprived situation where their autonomy is taken away. >> reporter: the plan has drawn the attention of peta and kim basinger who called the idea extremely cruel. but officials at the aquarium claim those critics are a vocal minority. the proo
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